Information as Universal Currency, and its Ambiguous Value


With the inspiring and massive changes occurring today in the areas of communications and specifically media,many novel questions related to its form and its value – both societal and personal – are being asked and any concrete, right-or-wrong answers are conspicuously, but advantageously unknown.

I say this ambiguity is beneficial because the actual process of asking these questions and then fleshing out their possible answers will usually lead to healthy and democratic dialogues, debate, experimentation and finally, new opportunities for human connection, knowledge and value for both participants and society –  especially if the media and its culture is intrinsically dedicated toward creating this public or civic worth.

Once online, it’s there forever.

One such powerful debate that has continuously peaked my interest and will not have a definitive answer anytime soon is the question of the true consequences of putting vast amounts (or even little amounts) of data, personal & otherwise, out on the web for all to see, use, share and unfortunately, to sometimes manipulate for nefarious purposes. Is there a trade-off between total transparency and safety online? Also, what kind of value is created by this online sharing of information?

This topic and the related questions are filled with examples of innovation, as well as fertile ideas and opinions related to social media and networks, privacy, societal norms and of course, the value derived for the person sharing the information and for the people receiving it. For an example of the awesome utility that can be placed (right or wrong) on sharing information online, ZDNet blogger Zack Wittaker writes “the one universal currency that we use in this post-modern world is information.”

Facebook Places hits the streets

One aspect of this debate has recently gained more steam as social networking giant Facebook has released “FaceBook Places,” which aims to connect its users where ever they go (Here is an article on the topic from the Nation, which also includes the FB Places release video.) In general, one side of the debate here argues that the ultimate tradeoff is between connecting with your friends and sharing info about different locations, businesses etc. and a person’s privacy being violated.

For example, “creepy” stalkers down the street can see that you are at the laundromat with your delicates without you really knowing it. Also, with Places your exact location can be broadcast by your friends (via tagging) even if you are not taking part in the program yourself. Another more basic argument against its use is that if we really wanted to connect with our pals out in the world there are already a million other ways to accomplish it (e.g. Facebook email, status updates, DM’s, instant messages etc.).

Not taking into account the obvious advantages for marketers and PR folks of “connecting with customers, clients and partners,” the other side of the location-based services debate has postulated that its use can engender “serendipitous” meetings and can foster the strengthening of personal relationships and make our lives just that much more connected and interesting. Ok.

No more resumes, just check out my digital content please.

So, using this debate of total transparency and value as a jumping off-point, and concentrating on personal value instead of societal, what about young pro’s who are looking for jobs in the communications industry and put all their content online for hiring managers to peruse and to ultimately contact them if they think they might be a good fit? For some examples of the type of content we publish everyday online think about resumes on Slideshare and LinkedIn (with cell #’s and addresses attached), past work & education experience on LinkedIn, articles written for college newspapers & websites, email addresses, non-private Facebook pages (to aid in find-ability) and blogs and About pages to name a few.

The personal value of sharing info such as a resume, for all the world to find through SERP’s for instance, could be that a graduate gets found by a recruiter on LinkedIn and lands a job when he/she would otherwise remain a shadow. But it’s surely a thin line between creating value or trouble for a person.

Should we continue to share our personal info online in the hopes of receiving benefit from it? Does the positives outweigh the negatives? And does your answer change when we consider creating value for others, instead of ourselves, through our content and collaborations? In this instance I would say yes, definitely. How about you?

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